Staples to Debate Conservative Foreign Policy at Manning Conference

(Ottawa) Rideau Institute president Steven Staples will be a guest panelist at the Manning Networking Conference to consider the question “Does Conservative Foreign Policy Need an Overhaul?”

“I am looking forward to a lively debate with the panelists and the conference participants,” said Staples, who is a well-known critic of many Conservative government policies, especially in the area of increased defence spending, Afghanistan, and the F-35 stealth fighter.

Mr. Colin Robertson, Vice President and Senior Research Fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, will chair the panel. Other confirmed panelists are Mr. Carlo Dade, Senior Fellow at the School of International Development and Global Studies at the University of Ottawa; Mr. Mark Cameron, former Director of Policy and Research at the Prime Minister’s Office; and Hon. Monte Solberg, former Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

The Manning Centre for Building Democracy is hosting its annual Manning Networking Conference (MNC) at the Ottawa Convention Centre from March 7  to March 9. The foreign policy panel is scheduled for Friday, March 8, 2013, from 10:45 a.m. to 11:50 a.m

More information is available from http://mnc2013.ca/program/

 

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